Theme Layout

[Rightsidebar]

Boxed or Wide or Framed

[Boxed]

Theme Translation

Display Featured Slider

Featured Slider Styles

[Fullwidth]

Display Grid Slider

Grid Slider Styles

Display Trending Posts

5/recent posts

Display Author Bio

Brenda has been writing since grade school. She attended journalism school where she majored in professional writing. She loves to decorate, garden, read and spend time with her Yorkies.

Display Instagram Footer

[No]
Brenda Pruitt. Powered by Blogger.

Search This Blog

Loading...

Java Talk: Menopause & Vulvar Vestibulitis



Today I am beginning a discussion on something I've had for ten years now. It began at the onset of menopause, and never went away. 

I know this is not decorating or gardening or anything pretty whatsoever. But if you suffer from this every day, it is way more important than any of those things, believe me.


I have not talked about this before, because, who wants to talk about their private parts? But I imagine every reader I have, or most, are women. And I don't want you to go around having to visit specialists for years like I did to understand why you are in so much pain.

I know some of my readers have this, so let's educate ourselves on what this is, and then we can open it up for discussion.




The Truth About Vulvar Vestibulitis

There is something fundamentally wrong with how many people (and even doctors!) think about Vulvar Vestibulitis. In fact, this is the most probable cause of why so many women try so many treatments and fail to see results. This article will focus on clearing up this distinction. But first, a bit of background knowledge to get us on the same page.

Vulvar Vestibulitis is a type of vulvodynia. It is a chronic pain illness that often has a rapid onset and is characterized by the following general symptoms (not all may apply to you; go to Vulvar Vestibulitis Symptoms for more specifics): redness/inflammation around the opening of the vagina (most commonly at the very top-towards urethra-or very bottom-towards anus.)
  • pain during sexual activity, especially with penetration
  • pain during the insertion of tampons
  • pain while sitting down
  • pain from wearing jeans or other tight clothing
  • pain/burning during urination
  • vaginal dryness
  • thinning vulvar skin that is prone to cracking
  • vaginal discharge (most commonly thin and white)
Many women with Vulvar Vestibulitis also suffer from depression and/or anxiety problems.

While there are differing opinion out there, it is generally often looked at as more of a symptom of Vulvar Vestibulitis rather than a cause (what woman with such pain wouldn't be anxious?!).
***

What this means for me is that I have not worn a pair of blue jeans with a zipper in 10 years. I keep them folded, covered with dust, on my closet shelf, because I can't bring myself to do away with them. 

Many days I can only work on the computer from my bed, lying down, in a gown. Which has been my last week. 

I know I will never have sex again, thus any type of romantic relationship. Or have a pelvic examination anymore. This is because I tear so easily, then get a secondary infection. 

I have to be very careful about what detergent or soap I use. Plus, you have to be VERY gentle washing because there is so much atrophy you can cause more damage.

When a female gynecologist examined me about ten years ago, she looked at me and said: "Your female parts are about as thin as an onion skin." 

This is thinness and atrophy. I knew then that life was not going to get easier. Because you can't turn the hands of time back.

I cannot sit anywhere long, which means I cannot drive very long. 

The pain is itchiness, burning, sharp pain in the vulvar area, and spasms.

So this affects every single day of my life. And I would not wish this on my worst enemy. 




What is the cause of vulvar vestibulitis?
The exact cause is unknown, but many studies are being conducted to determine the cause of vulvar vestibulitis.
Helpful treatment hints:
A and D Ointment
  • How it is used: Apply to the areas of discomfort.
  • How it Works: Protects the skin, decreases irritation, heals and soothes.
Lidocaine Gel may be prescribed after initial treatment.
  • How it is used: Apply to the areas of discomfort.
  • How it Works: Numbs areas before intercourse.
  • Caution: After applying, wait until area becomes less sensitive before intercourse. Burning may occur for a short time (five to 10 minutes) after the gel is applied.
Witch Hazel Pads (TUCS Pads)
  • How it is used: Apply to the areas of discomfort.
  • How it Works: Decreases burning and irritation after intercourse and urinating.
Cleansing Bottle
  • Pour plain luke-warm water over the vulva after urinating to remove urine from irritated area.
Calcium Citrate Tablets
  • How it is used: Take orally 1200-1800mg. elemental calcium every day.
  • How it works: Thought to decrease certain crystals in the urine that may cause burning.
Limit High Oxalate Foods
  • May decrease amount of oxalate crystals in urine. Oxalate crystals cause urinary symptoms such as the urge to urinate frequently or suddenly.
Baking Soda Soak
  • Soak in luke warm bath water with four to five tablespoons of baking soda to help soothe vulvar itching and burning. Soak one to three times a day for 10 to 15 minutes. If you are using a sitz bath, use one to two teaspoons of baking soda.
I am currently trying homeopathic remedies such as spirulina, primrose oil, and coconut oil. Anything for some relief. And limiting high oxalate foods. 
I have had a UTI for two weeks, so I would just love to get back to having my one cup of decaf in the morning!
So if you are menopausal or entering or leaving this time of life every woman must get through, what changes are you having the most problem with?
I know this is a subject that many have trouble discussing, but if you are in enough pain, you want to know what other women are doing to get relief.
Cozy Little House
70 Comments
Share :

70 comments:

  1. I'd never heard of this.... I'm sure your honest and open post will help many who havent been able to discuss this...sorry you have to deal with it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have not been able to bring myself to talk about this before. But I would hate to think of others suffering and not knowing what it is.

      Delete
  2. Thank you for discussing this Brenda. I don't suffer from this condition but I am sure there are many ladies out there who do. Now that I am in menopause I find I am warmer than I previously was. It takes me awhile at night to cool down. Saves on the heating bill!:)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I could take warmer (though I know it can be very uncomfortable) if I could just sit down!

      Delete
  3. I'd never heard of this before! It sounds awful, and I'm sorry you are suffering from it. Thanks for posting about it ~ hopefully it will encourage women to talk with their docs about it ~

    ReplyDelete
  4. Most people haven't. Unless they end up with it. It is not for the faint of heart!

    ReplyDelete
  5. One reason I love you, Brenda, is that you don't mince words and you certainly don't shy away from difficult topics. :-) Having had a hysterectomy at age 37, I found myself with some of those same symptoms by the age of 40. My gynecologist just kept prescribing different types of estrogen and telling me that was just about all he could do.

    I did some research and found out about a local compounding pharmacist who made bio-identical prescriptions based upon the individual (now THAT's a concept!). I did the mandatory saliva testing and went to a doctor to go over the results. It turned out that my body naturally makes TOO MUCH estrogen (I still have my ovaries) and was in dire need of some progesterone to balance it out. (Side note: Conventional medicine usually dictates that a woman without a uterus doesn't require progesterone--not true.) Every other month I had two cream prescriptions made especially for ME.

    Sorry if that was TMI, and I know some women are very much against hormone replacement therapy, but I would strongly suggest that anyone with such symptoms at least have the saliva testing done to rule out severe imbalances like I had. I stayed on the HRT just for a year or two until everything balanced out.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hm. Well, I don't have a gynecologist, because I refuse to have a pelvic exam, and that is the first thing they want to do. I asked if my internist could compound something and they said it was out of her range of knowledge. But the co-pay for the gynecologist is twice what it is for the internist. Guess I'll have to eventually do it.

      Delete
    2. And why would you even worry if something is too TMI for me? Obviously not much would be!

      Delete
  6. I also have never heard of the condition you are suffering with. I have other feminine issues and last evening I was doing some online research trying to find something 'alternative' to help me. So I came across something called Neueve, developed by a woman doctor. It is sold on their website and also available on Amazon. They offer suppositories but perhaps you would benefit from the Cream for vulvar dryness and itching. It's worth reading, and the Amazon testimonials are very positive. Hope you find something to help you, Brenda!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I will look it up. I've ton lots of research on what I have, believe me.

      Delete
  7. This may not be the case for everyone, I am sure it is not, but I had the same thing you describe , went to the Dr. finally and found out that I was diabetic, since I have my blood sugar under control all the symptoms you describe went away. Thank goodness! As you said it is horrible! So just a thought, even though you may not be diabetic, limiting or cutting out sugar might help

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm not diabetic. Or last time they checked I wasn't. But I do eat too many sweets. I'll eat cereal for breakfast and supper. So I need to cut down I know.

      Delete
    2. Lately I was having a lot of yeast infections and doctors didn't tell me I was pre-diabetic if I didn't ask for my sugar levels. Now I control my sugar levels consuming aloe ( they also come in capsules) and dieting, now my yeast infections have disappeared. Aloe can also be used topically for yeast infections.

      Delete
  8. I am an RN and have been an OBGYN nurse for 15 plus years. The best help we can offer patients is a hormone cream that has estrogen in it. The thinness of the vaginal walls comes from lack of estrogen. Which causes dryness and almost a chapped sensation of burning and itching. While you can have your hormones tested after menopause we know that they will be very low or nonexistent values. Blood levels are the most reliable method and many compounding pharmacies will offer saliva tests but the saliva is not a reliable method of testing. Their are many forms of estrogen replacement therapy and any will definitely help. I hope anyone who suffers with this go to their GYN and replace what your body used to make. I have seen many women helped with estrogen cream...the results are dramatic.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. She ordered estrogen cream. But I got to the pharmacy and it was $100 for a tube, and I couldn't afford it.

      Delete
    2. https://www.pparx.org

      http://www.rxassist.org/

      http://www.healthfinder.gov/rxdrug/

      Delete
    3. I tried these links. I put in estrogen and estrogen cream and all said there were no results.

      Delete
    4. No, you will need to get a brand name. Someone further down listed a name for an estrogen ring... Estring, perhaps? A little research should help you find brand names for various creams, or maybe you could call a pharmacy and ask for specific names.

      Delete
  9. Interesting. I'm not dealing with this, or menopause, yet... BUT - I'm getting grey hair and acne at the same time?! I never thought I'd be desperate for an answer to something so superficial, but my face looks like a 13 year old boy's face. I have tried expensive creams, otc options, and I'm at a loss. So frustrated. It is painful, and there just isn't enough makeup on the planet to cover it. Darn hormones are not fun. My mom had a hysterectomy at an early age, due to cysts. I've not been to the doctor in a while (shame on me), but I really need to go. Hope you get answers soon, and some relief.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't how to answer that one. I never stopped getting zits before or after menopause.

      Delete
    2. I've had GREAT luck with Erno Laszlo's black soap. ( 51 and horrible hormonal acne, especially along my jawline) Spendy but cleared me up almost overnight. I have had friends who have also had great experiences with African black soap clearing up their acne.

      Delete
  10. I don't know anything about what you have, but surely there is something to help you. I would see a GYN when you are able to. I'm past menopause now so when I started spotting about 3 years ago, I was terrified. My GYN did a biopsy and determined that I had a thickened lining and hyperplasia, so I had to undergo a D&C. After that was done, I had several follow-up biopsies to make sure the lining was like it should be and to check for cancer cells. So far all is well. She hasn't done anymore biopsies in a good while for which I'm thankful, those were painful! I'm hopeful that the problems are over although I did see a spot of blood not long ago but I think I scratched myself. At least that is what I hope it was. If I have more, I'll be going back. Anyway, all that said to alert your readers....if you see any spotting and are past menopause, get to the doctor asap. Oh, one more thing...Vitamin E taken during menopause helped alleviate my hot flashes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've never had that. But I would let them know if I saw blood. I just hate to go to the gyno because of the $50 co-pay.

      Delete
  11. I might add that spotting doesn't always mean something bad is happening, but early detection is better than waiting too long. Also the Vitamin E I took was 400 IU a day.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Brenda, I am so sorry you have this. It sounds very painful. My problems are more in the rectal area since I tore big time with the birth of my first child (who's birthday is today!) I have never 'healed' correctly since I have 'delicate tissue' and so have lots of problems but I just manage them the best I can. I was offered some surgery once, but I declined as I was not convinced it would make it better. What we ladies go through and birthing babies is not easy on the plumbing. I love how you will talk about things like this, I know it will help many others.

    Linda

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Seems to me women have to deal with a lot of crap, huh?

      Delete
  13. Following my hysterectomy at age 50 I dealt with chronic vaginal burning. It caused severe anxiety for all the reasons you describe. I ended up at a pelvic pain clinic and finally biofeedback and physical therapy helped. I was told it would never go away, but it has. I had a set back before a hip replacement, but that was temporary. The doctors thought I was nuts until I ended up at the pain clinic. I had a neurontin cream made at a compounding pharmacy , but the Physical Therapy taught me to relax.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've tried every way to relax. Of course stress doesn't help. Sometimes I will take a muscle relaxant, but it doesn't help much.

      Delete
    2. Brenda, the PT was personally invasive but did help me learn to relax my pelvis. My incredibly stressful job (school principal) also helped to break the pain cycle. It was so bad I just wanted to die. The most important thing was someone finally believed that the pain was real. We both know it is and we did not cause it. Very little is really known about this because women don't talk about it. Thank you for breaking the silence.

      Delete
    3. I should have broken the silence years ago.

      Delete
  14. You are living with a disability. It' saddening what this condition is doing your life. I haven't heard of it and I'm hoping the home treatments bring you some relief. Especially coconut oil. It does wonders for so many things.

    Interesting thoughts about the sugar/sweets intake and possible factor. I'm currently post menopausal. My first few years in my late 40's were terrible. Then things got a lot easier. But the smooth sailing vacation stopped. The last two years have been sheer hell. Hell... as I felt I was burning up in it. The hot flashes sent me outdoors in the dead of winter, even below 0 to cool off in underwear and a t shirt. Every 20-30 minutes! The sweat poured off me so much, I used towels to soak it off. My hair looked like I just washed it. And I took cold showers throughout each day and slept at night, if I could, with a fan on my face on the night stand. I was lucky if I got 2 hours of sleep and they were interrupted with cold wet wash cloths. Pimples ...55 years old... my face, chest, and back, despite my constant cleanliness. A walking zombie nightmare is how felt about myself. (Not pretty by any means)

    Allergic to so many synthetic medications, I resorted to home treatments via doctor advice without relief. Then after some research, I stopped all sugar just 3 months ago. Even my beloved chocolate. If I have a hot flash only once every few hours, I'm grateful. It's been like a vacation lately. Knocking out sweets has helped what ever lack of estrogen attacks I'm going through. I also started probiotics shortly after (cheap over the counter from Walmart) for gastric intestinal health. Between those two actions, I am so relieved of suffering. Now, my situation is far different, but I wonder if there is a link with sweets. Maybe oatmeal with honey instead of other cereals? Grapefruit? Change in diet that you can afford, and those home cream remedies?

    This brings me to another topic. Knowing what you are going through, have you applied for disability? My baby sister did and ended up getting it through health reasons. You have been through so much and I'm praying and hoping for things to get so much better for you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The only way to file would be to say I can't blog anymore, and that isn't true.

      Delete
  15. Very interesting. I have had the knife like pains. I was going to say something to my doctor. I tried to figure out why I would have them. Maybe this is the cause. The pain I had was similar to when I have had ecoli UTIs. The sharp pain doesn't usually last too long but I had no clue what was causing it. Hmmmmm. Thanks for bringing up this issue.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No, the stabbing pain for me comes quick and thankfully is gone. I just wish the other symptoms would do the same. But ten years later, still dealing with it every day.

      Delete
  16. I have no idea if this could help, but my mother had this condition and it nearly drove her crazy. After going to gynos and internal medicine docs ,who prescribed a variety of creams and ointments, she finally went to a dermatologist. They treated her with some kind of light in the office. She had to go for a few treatments, but it went away completely. It reoccurred a few years later, and the doctor had retired. She had to call quite a few before she found someone who knew what she was talking about and could repeat the treatment. It worked like a charm once again. It has never reoccurred. I wish I knew exactly what they did, but maybe someone who knows dermatology might. It changed my mom's life!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I will check around. I have not heard of this. Ten years ago, gynecologists would just get frustrated because they didn't know what to do. Hopefully that has changed somewhat. They mentioned scleraderma (sp?) and I believe that is a dermatological disease.

      Delete
  17. Oh, Brenda, I am so sorry that you suffer from this. I have read about it but have never known anyone that would ever talk about it. My respect for you just tripled for being so open and honest about something I am sure is uncomfortable to talk about. I hope this reaches just one person and helps them...then you will be rewarded by knowing you helped someone else...and that they are not alone. xo Diana

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I haven't encountered many women who have it. But then I haven't talked about it much. I do have several readers who have told me it made their life a living hell. It breaks up marriages. Constant pain. Physical and emotional.

      Delete
  18. OMG Brenda - that is horrible! I thought hot flushes and night sweats were bad, but that seems like nothing now. Yep - yall are right. Tough to be a girl. Hope with this post, info comes in that may help. To deal with that would add to anxiety for sure!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wear very loose clothing. Usually men's shorts. Cotton underwear. I do not use fabric softeners in washing them. I use a detergent that is free of any additives. I have to be very careful with caffeine use. One cup of mostly decaf a day. And right now, I can't even have that. I'm going through a bad spot with it. It's always there, but some times are worse than others. I had no idea that this was going to be my nightmare with menopause. There are possible genetic implications also.

      Delete
    2. I use Trader Joe's Lavendar sachets to dry my clothes. I can't use usual laundry detergent either. I use very little mild detergent. When you think about it your clothes aren't really dirty, We just need to freshen them with clean water and mild soap. Stay away from harsh chemicals.

      Delete
  19. Dear Brenda..you are so brave to share this in hopes of helping other women..but then I would expect no less of you as that's the kind of lady you are..I have never dealt with this and hopefully never will..I wish you and any other ladies going through this all the best of luck..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope you never have to deal with it. I would hope they'd find a cure and no woman would have to deal with it.

      Delete
  20. Dear Brave Brenda, you may have changed someone's life by your willingness to speak of the unspeakable. And I hope your life may be changed by someone else having an answer for you. You are truly amazing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wouldn't want someone to go to countless doctors, be examined only to tear and have an infection within 48 hours, that lasts several months. Like I did. I knew no one else who had it, so how could they possibly understand when I said no, I can't drive two hours to go to something with you. I cannot sit through a movie with you. I can go to lunch if I have a pillow but we can't stay more than 45 minutes to an hour at most. It changes your whole life.

      Delete
  21. I hate to say I can relate to this post. I'm a bit older than you. I'm here to offer you hope....it does incredibly improve!! I'm not sure why my condition improved but after years of discomfort I feel like my old self. The only changes I've made is my diet. What most people consider a lunch or dinner portion I eat half of that.....mainly vegetables and fruit. Don't get me wrong, I'm never hungry I just eat different. I know you love coffee but I cut that out. I loved coffee but realized it was causing me big problems. Since I stopped that and switched to tea my life has unbelievably improved.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I can cut out coffee, and cut out sweets. But I don't understand how that will magically thicken my tissues and bring estrogen back to that area. I have a lot of atrophy. I wish I knew what happened with your body.

      Delete
    2. Oh, forgot to say: Whatever it was that turned this around for you, I am very, very happy for you that you have your life back.

      Delete
    3. It will always be something I have to be careful about. I have no idea howler why the changedes improved things for me. I'm not saying the tissue has thickened it's just not as sensitive by a long shot. The only thing I can come up with is my body has an allergic reaction to certain foods that shows up differently than most people. I can tell immediately when I've eaten or drank anything that triggers it. Anything acidic has to be avoided. Its weird because at the same time I started with severe dry eye problems. I have to believe it's all a bit related. I know hahaha it's called a bit of the aging process....I guess.

      Delete
  22. I have heard of this but personally don't know of anyone who had it - until now. I am so sorry you're having to deal with this nightmare. I had a hysterectomy 7 years ago but the surgeon left one ovary so that I wouldn't be thrown into instant menopause. Now that I'm almost 53, I'm now going through menopause. I get the occasional hot flash and some night sweats and have some dryness issues, but that's it. I eat a very healthy diet and exercise (though need to do more) plus I take certain supplement, so I hope all that plays a factor in keeping menopause symptoms minimal. Like you, I take Evening Primrose Oil. I also take Omega-3's.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I had a vaginal hysterectomy at 28, but left both my ovaries. I had had a terrible time with yeast infections and bladder infections before that. The surgeon told me that when he got inside, he found that my uterus had grown into my bladder like a tree trunk. And he was forced to take tiny pieces out vaginally because he'd already had me under too long. Then the infections pretty much ceased until age 48, at the onset of menopause. And then it became this.

      Delete
  23. A friend has this. It started a little over a year ago. It's changed her life dramatically, and not in a good way. She can't sit for long so things like going to the movies or dinner are out. She doesn't know what the future holds, and I feel so bad for her, and you as well. :(

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tell her I feel for her, and if she ever wants to email me just so she knows someone else with this, I'm here. It's a feeling that sets you apart, and causes a lot of depression and anxiety. And futility.

      Delete
  24. A friend has this. It started a little over a year ago. It's changed her life dramatically, and not in a good way. She can't sit for long so things like going to the movies or dinner are out. She doesn't know what the future holds, and I feel so bad for her, and you as well. :(

    ReplyDelete
  25. I know what you are talking about but didn't know it's name. I'd had some spotting (8 years into menopause) and immediately got sent to the gym to be checked out with a biopsy etc. I'd just had a very large pancreatic tumour removed do I was followed quite carefully. The doc knew I'd been having all the problems you mentioned since he said my tissues were paper thin. He was cautious about the hormones due to my other recent surgery but felt just a low dose of estrogen in that area would be very helpful. Yes, it was. He prescribed Est-ring (I think, since I haven't needed it in a while). It's one of those insert able rings that slowly releases a low dose of estrogen just in that localized area. It was a pleasure to be able to sit down comfortably once again. His concern was that with the atrophy in the tissues he was seeing, he knew that I would soon begin to experience bladder issues since it would also begin to experience shrinkage to its tissues and that would create a whole new problem. I have no idea how much the ring costs because all drugs/prescriptions/medical equipment are covered under my employer's benefits plan (each ring lasts 3 months I believe). I don't know how my American family members (hubby's family) manage to deal with the expense of hospital or medical care. I guess I'm very fortunate to just see a doctor whenever I need one without needing to pay for it. But that's another story and one that seems to be quite devise on your side of the border.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have health insurance, but can't always pay the co-pays. I've never heard of the ring. But about five years ago, I just gave up on going to gynecologists, because none of them seemed to know what to do. Or knew much about this. So I just suffered, with an occasional tube of Estrace from the internist, which is half the price of Premarin cream even with health insurance. Still, it's $50 and won't last more than a month.

      Delete
  26. I'm so sorry that you are going through this but glad that you're sharing with all of us and also glad that it opened up a good conversation about it. I have never heard of this before but I have a few friends that are having some of the same problems so I will tell them about you so they can go to their doctors for more help. While I don't have this problem, reading through all of the comments I do have some of the problems of menopause and glad to know I'm not the only one. Sending out good thoughts out to you and all the women who are suffering that were brave enough to speak out.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tell them there are online forums for women with these medical ailments. Just to know you're not alone.

      Delete
  27. Oh God... being a woman just SUCKS sometimes... :o( I don't have this and haven't entered into menopause yet but appreciate you sharing. It took a lot of courage I'm sure but you will and have probably already helped someone out there.

    Tania

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wish you an easy and uneventful menopause. Truly I do.

      Delete
  28. Brenda, I'm so sorry you have to deal with this. I'm fortunate I don't have UTI's and even though I am a diabetic, I don't have this other illness either. I had such horrible periods for years, lasting two weeks and very heavy. Such severe cramps, it kept me home from school each month. So, menopause has been a breeze for me. No night sweats, very little hot flashes. I hope some of the natural holistic options you are trying give you some relief. Hugs to you, my friend.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Due to my bad periods, I had a hysterectomy at 28.

      Delete
  29. Brenda, I don't know anything about the Public Health System where you live, but here in Georgia (I worked in Public Health for 24 years), our health departments have Nurse Practitioners who will see you (females), and they are able to give samples of medications that you may need, such as the creams. Pharmaceutical companies are not as free with samples as they were at one time, but it is still possible to get some. Also, in GA, Public Health services costs are based on income, on a sliding fee scale. You might call and see if your area has any of these possibilities. Also, the pharmaceutical companies provide financial assistance for their drugs as well. Most Drs. have a form you can complete and send to the companies to get your medications free or at a lower cost. I hope you get some relief, and I really hope you can find a way to get this taken care of. You've been miserable long enough.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Will check into it. Yes, ten years is long LONG enough!

      Delete
  30. I'm am beyond grateful for this post. I had a complete hysterectomy at 22. I just turned 50 last November. I have two spots that are the same as you describe. I have not had my gyn check it, but she did touch it and said nothing! Not one word after I said the spots are really painful. Making love is over, pants, clothing is extremely loose, to the point of falling off. But that's life right. All the responses are some I will definitely try instead of expensive prescriptions.
    I personally thank you for not being afraid to bring this up. Yes it is very sensitive material, however, it MUST be shared to help out others. I believe you have made a difference in my life. Thank you.
    I pray you find a product that will help you and not cost you an arm and a leg. I will keep you in my prayers. To all the ladies here, please never stop talking, sharing and keeping the female lines of communication open to help one another.
    Be blessed and be a blessing, Hope

    ReplyDelete
  31. Brenda...when I was going through "The Change" my GYN wanted to put me on Estrogen replacement and I was just not comfortable with the risks involved with it. I tried an OTC product called Estroven for my night sweets and hot flashes and it worked great for me. Maybe this is something you would want to look into and try...just a thought. Sorry you have been going through all this!
    Sue

    ReplyDelete
  32. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  33. I really appreciate your post and you explain each and every point very well. Thanks for sharing this information. And I’ll love to read your next post too.

    see more on: testocreams.com

    ReplyDelete
  34. I had no idea that this could happen.
    I'm glad you are discussing this and so sorry that you are dealing with this.
    I really hope they can find a cure or can relieve you of this pain and all that's related to
    this problem.
    Take care-
    m~

    ReplyDelete

I always enjoy reading your comments and having you join the conversation here at Cozy Little House. It is like having a gathering of friends sitting in my cozy apartment. Enjoying coffee and dessert, chatting and having a good time. I appreciate each and every one of you!

About Author

[name=] [img=
] [description=Brenda has been writing since grade school. She attended journalism school where she majored in professional writing. She loves to decorate, garden, read and spend time with her Yorkies.] (facebook=https://www.facebook.com/brendampruitt) (twitter=https://twitter.com/cozylittlehouse) (instagram=Instagram Profile Url) (bloglovin=https://www.bloglovin.com/blogs/cozy-little-house-4048071) (pinterest=https://www.pinterest.com/brendak) (tumblr=Tumblr Profile Url)

Follow @georgialoustudios