Abi Is Home. Sort Of.

Abi is home now. I brought her home in the little crate, but of course she wanted out. 


I got those two sentences written, sitting on the floor on a pile of quilts with Abi next to me. And I heard a tear. She had torn two of the staples out and blood was gushing. 

I called the vet. They said bring her back. My nice neighbor Charlie drove me and Abi in my car back across town. His wife is pretty sickly and doesn't go out much. 

As we went out the door to my car, Charlie Ross went tearing out at a fast clip when the attention was focused elsewhere. Abi was back in the crate, so I ran after him. I finally caught him after several blocks, and brought him back. 

Took Abi, bleeding, back to the vet. They had to replace several staples and wrapped her entire leg in thick gauze. They put a cone on her head and put her back in the crate. 

We started for home. She was thrashing around inside of the crate. 

When I got back home, I opened the door of the crate and she had torn the cone in half. I was at my wit's end. 

I AM at my wit's end. 

The only way I can type this is to hold her between both my legs and try to be ready if she leaps back up again.

She will not be still two seconds. She can't get comfortable with this all the way up to her belly. I try to find ways to cushion her, but she is not a happy camper. She refuses to sleep.

Meanwhile neighbor Charlie is headed to Petsmart to get a different kind of cone that is supposed to be more like an inner tube. If she tears that one off, back she goes to the vet.

How on earth am I going to keep this on her for two weeks when she is determined to get it off? Every few sentences she attempts to rip at the gauze.

The neighbor's daughter is sick in Nashville in the hospital, so they're probably going to have to go there. Short of calling Israel, I will be alone with this. But he has to work. 

I'm one-handed while I carry her around everywhere I go.

Still they say it is too dangerous to sedate her. 

I'm ready for someone to please sedate me.

62 comments

  1. Sounds like a nightmare Brenda-so sorry!

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  2. Oh little baby Abi!!! They do sell some homeopathic stuff to help calm dogs - perhaps your neighbor can pick it up while he's at Petsmart? They sell a ThunderShirt and also some calming treats and collars. I have the thundershirt for my little dog, she likes it. I bought the treats for her but haven't tried them yet.

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    1. I was also going to second the Thundershirt and Rescue Remedy--I used to give it to my Labs to get through the Fourth of July fireworks. I've taken it myself, totally safe.

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  3. Oh no. Would it be safe to let her have small doses of Benadryl to keep her calm but awake? Wish you lived closer and I would help.

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  4. Oh my word, I am so sorry for you and Abi. This doesn't sound good for either one of you. I will keep the prayers going that she calms down.

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  5. Poor Abi, and poor YOU!!! Valerie beat me to the suggestion of Benadryl. There are also CDs of calming music/noises to help calm puppers.
    Bless your friend Charlie!!
    Sending you thoughts of calmness, strength, and peace ~

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  6. Oh man! You have your work cut out for you. I hope she settles down soon!

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  7. you may have to get a larger crate. one she can move around in but not enough to mess with the dressing.. I agree the benedryl will work. not good to give them meds but in this instance it might be best..

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  8. Why is it too dangerous to sedate her? Is it because of her age?

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    1. I was wondering about this, too.

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    2. I don't know. But I've asked them three times, telling them I can't calm her. And they just keep saying it's too dangerous to give her something. All they sent home is Rimadyl.

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  9. Oh my.....poor Abi. Poor Brenda. I know this sounds a bit crazy but do you have a rocking chair? My dogs have all been large (labs, danes, etc) but my cats have been small. You can calm a sick cat by rocking it. At first they resist and it's necessary to hold them against their will but with patience they will calm down. I sat a lot of nights with sick babies and cats over the years and what do you have to lose? Can't help with the benedryl as I'm allergic to it but I would feel better having a vet answer that.

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    1. No rocking chair. I'm just keeping her between my feet or close to me. I can't keep the cone on her. She manages to slip right out of it. Apparently you're supposed to attach it to a collar. And she has trachea problems and can't wear a collar. Every time she goes to chew on her leg, (and they REALLY wrapped it this last time. It would take her awhile to get past it) I pick up the cone that she can get out of, and she stops because she hates it.

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  10. Oh Brenda I can imagine you have your hands full, literally. We had to go through the cone thing too with our dog several times in the past and I know it is difficult. Poor little Abi and I feel for you completely. Wish I could help you but Dallas is too far. Take care!

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  11. Oh Brenda, wish some of us lived close to you so that we could help. The best that can offer are my prayers for you and Abi, and that rascal Charlie. Blesings! Carolyn in Florida

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  12. Oh, no! Poor little Abi! Poor little you! I'm so so sorry. Wish I lived close to you so I could help. Saying prayers.
    Blessings,
    Shelia ;)

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  13. oh no what a nightmare ....there should be some sort ot safe for dogs valium that the vet could try on her even if they did the first day at the office there ? Poor Abi and POOR YOU!!

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  14. Brenda,
    So sorry to hear this. How frustrating for you and to be alone to deal with this. I wish I lived closer to come by and help you out. Poor Abi must just be feeling miserable. Can they give her something to calm her by RX so she can at least sleep for a little while and you can get some rest too. Just feel for both of you.
    So sorry.
    Kris

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  15. I feel for both you and Abi. There's got to be a cone that will work. One of my grand dogs wears a cone to keep her from gnawing on a sore and she's super hyper. I hope things settle down soon.

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  16. you have no choice you have to buy a big crate and crate her. She is to hyper and cannot be still. So sorry this is awful. If she cannot be tranquilized, crate her for the duration except for potty breaks. My friend has a 100 pound dog and they are dealing with the same issue. Its terrible.

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    1. She got out of the new cone pretty fast. Even if I crate her, she will still tear off that bandage that is all the way up her leg now, and rip out the staples. She's pretty determined.

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  17. Can you find out when she had her medication last.? You can then deceide if it is stimulating her instead of calming her or if it is not relieving her pain. This level of agitation seems like a paradoxical reaction to meds or incomplete relief of pain. If she doesn't calm, could she stay at the vets? I If no one will be with her at night, ask the vet if she can be a day patient at the hospital- you drop her off in the AM and pick her up at closing. At least you'll get a bit of sleep. If worse comes to worse, maybe your vet can refer her to one of the larger veterinary surgical specialty hospitals that have emergency services as well. She can recover as an in patient there until she calms down and you can handle her better. ( I did this, it's costly but so worth it).
    P.S. Do not remove her cone. Hand feed her and hold up the water dish for her to drink. They're more clever and faster than us.

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    1. The cone didn't last. And I know they gave her all her meds this morning, and said don't give her anything else today. I don't think they want to keep her either. She'd tear the bandage off there too. No one could watch her there like I am here. I laid down with her this afternoon and got some rest by putting my head in her bed so I could feel if she moved.

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  18. Bless your hearts!! I do hope you two find a way to cope. I'm clueless and have no advice, just sending good thoughts your way!

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  20. Oh Brenda,
    I can totally relate....my pup was 50 pounds and she had to have the surgery twice...one time for free...it didn't work....I had to put her down as she tore the other hind leg one and couldn't walk....I would never do this again...she is small so you have the advantage....hold her tight...you're starting down a long road, but she is worth it!

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  21. It's hard when they are so fast and determined. And you have Charlie that is upset too. Thank goodness you have such a great neighbor. I agree, I'd ask about the Benedryl. I've given it to Ziggy a couple of times and he's about 12 lbs.I hope the next cone works or we will be sedating you!

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  22. Can they/you bandage her higher up her leg? They did that with my dog when she couldn't calm herself. Just a crazy thought...find or make a cone that would go on her leg above her stitches but wouldn't allow her to get to her stitches. She wouldn't be able to walk easily but you don't want her walking too much anyway. After a few days when her meds are lowered she'll be more herself and not nutty from surgery

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  23. Aw, poor Abi! Bless her heart. You may have to just keep her in the crate until she can calm down, hopefully. That may sound cruel, but it's better than her tugging at her bandages and making things worse. Not sure why she wasn't given a sedative. Just know I'm still praying.

    Georgia

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  24. I'm so sorry to hear Abi. I hope and pray she gets better really soon. I know it's so hard to keep these little guys from running around, even after surgery. My Cocoa had surgery just last spring, and I went through the same situation. Please know both you and Abi are in my prayers for a very speedy recovery!

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  25. Would she be better off at the vet's for a bit? Is she the type that would be more quiet there? (Or would she just get more anxious?)

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  26. It's so hard for them, isn't it? They live in the present (I want this off NOW! I don't like this!) and can't see the long term like we can--they don't understand that what we're doing to them/for them now won't last forever and will help them feel better eventually.

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  27. oh no Brenda! I hope things get better! Poor you and Poor Abi!!

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  28. I truly wish I lived closer to you so I could help poor you and poor Abi. Very frustrating! I'm so sorry you are both going through such a difficult time. Thinking of you...

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  30. so sorry for you both. you will be exhausted trying to keep Abi safe. I am in Fl., no help here, either. keep us up to date.

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  31. Brenda, our yorkie-poo chewed out her stitches when we had her spayed and had to have anesthesia again so they could repair the damage. I made a sweater of sorts out of a long sleeve of one of my shirts and slipped it over her incision. That's the only way she'd leave it alone. Is there some way you could do something like that? I feel your pain!

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  32. Oh my, sending hugs and prayers...

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  33. Oh Brenda, my heart goes out to you. And to Abi. I know that others above have given you good ideas and please remember that she will get used to the cone once you have a new one and it sounds so much more comfortable that the rigid ones. Having been through cone after surgery with many of our fur babies I've learned that they do adapt to it.

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  34. Oh Brenda I've been there just gotta hang in there it'll get better

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  35. I'm so sorry you're having such trauma with your baby. I must have somehow missed the post about what happened to her

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  36. OH Brenda, I'm sorry to hear this...I just hope this phase passes quickly. So sorry they can't sedate her...xo

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  37. Maybe you could get them to cast the leg. I've sitting at home with my foot casted and am off work so I've turned the TV on for the first time in months.

    Twice today I've seen a commercial of a tiny dog with his leg casted and he's walking along on the sidewalk. The cast is one of the light weight fibreglass ones. Maybe that would allow her yo move around without redamaging the repair. I'm casted because of surgery on my achilles tendon aND my cast let's me be mobile without ruining the tenfon repair.

    Just a thought.

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  38. I saw a cape thing on another blog dog that just looks like a cape, but the dog can't get to the injury

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  39. Maybe the vet has some ideas about how to deal with this sort of thing? I do hope you and Abo get some sleep tonight.

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  40. Oh my goodness, what a pain - for both of you! She can't be the first dog to go through cones and chew at her bandages...you'd think the vet's office would have a better solution. Could she take some kind of relaxer or sedative?

    You running after Charlie for several blocks...I was surprised you could do this. Are you out of the boot now?

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  41. How about a benadryl. ha. She needs something to calm her down so that you can be calm. Our pet babies certainly challenge us! Will check back tomorrow. Sheila

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  42. Oh my goodness! This sounds exhausting Brenda! I pray she settles down soon and hopefully you both can rest tonight.
    Hugs!

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  43. Oh my goodness! This sounds exhausting Brenda! I pray she settles down soon and hopefully you both can rest tonight.
    Hugs!

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  44. Oh my goodness! What a disaster! I feel your pain. I wish I had an easy answer for you on how to handle this better. You may have to get firm with her and tell her "NO"when she tries to do something she shouldn't. My dog is scared of loud voices so he usually heeds the word "no" when told.

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  45. Oh, no. I am so sorry this happened. Fingers crossed that yall get some rest tonight. xx

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  46. This sounds like a nightmare. I like Kari's advice. I would seriously get answers on meds that calm her. Milo is 13 and he had pain meds after his surgery in April along with his anti seizure drug (phenobarbital). Quite a cocktail! His cone fit well and lasted two weeks. I've heard of the PetSmart alternative, it's worth checking out. I tried the Thunder Shirt for the 4th of July and it was a waste of my money.

    It's nature for an animal to lick its wound but she is going to get a bad infection and that's going to be terrible and cost you a lot more in vet costs. If she were mine I'd have her boarded at the vet where she can be confined and watched for 16 hours a day and given something to calm her at night. But I trust you will find the answer.
    Hugs to you...you are so loving to your babies!

    Jane x

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  47. I wish I could be there for you too Brenda...I also wish I had good advice for you but I know I would be so frustrated...Here's hoping she comes down and soon..Please let us know how she and you are doing tomorrow...

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  48. If she is calm when you hold her perhaps you could use a shawl or something and swaddle her to your chest. Your presence might calm her and wrapping her might keep the limbs out of her reach. Just a thought, I am not a dog owner, just the mother of a retarded daughter who hits herself. Swaddling her worked for a while when she was young. Also cuddling.

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  49. Friend Brenda,
    I looked all over the Internet to find out what you should do and you aren't alone in this situation. But, no one seems to have an answer for it except the Elizabethan collar which some people claim the pup will get used to in 3-4 days. I think you should take the Benadryl. It might be a rough night. Best thoughts.
    Ginene

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  50. If she is calm when you hold her perhaps you could use a shawl or something and swaddle her to your chest. Your presence might calm her and wrapping her might keep the limbs out of her reach. Just a thought, I am not a dog owner, just the mother of a retarded daughter who hits herself. Swaddling her worked for a while when she was young. Also cuddling.

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  51. Oh my Brenda. I've used massage to calm my restless and frantic pups after surgery, during thunderstorms and more. The best place is on their chest - the rounded part that protrudes a bit. Calmly, slowly and rather firmly, massage by opening your hand and and squeezing over the chest. The slower, the better. After a while, I could actually feel her relax...and she calmed down. As soon as she started to become agitated, I would do it again. I spent alot of time with them settled in a nest of fleece on my lap...rocking. It all worked like a charm for me. Hope it works for you.

    Hugs,
    Jan ♥

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  52. Sweet Abi! Bless her heart.... Ask your vet about benadryl. I had a yorkie that would get car sick. We had to make a long drive, once, and the vet told me to give him benadryl (a low dosage) to help him rest through the drive. It may calm her nerves until she is used to it. I'm so sorry you are battling this! Poor puppy!

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  53. Rescue Remedy does not work on Bentley. I was beside myself when we first moved to Texas and Bentley got fleas. Before we got the right formula for flea protection, I tried Benedryl. Not only did it control the itching but it also calmed him down. I have read that it can be used when a dog is excitable. It might be worth a try. Poor baby, she doesn't understand and she is frustrated and uncomfortable. So sorry.

    Big Texas Hugs,
    Susan and Bentley

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