5 Frugal & Natural Garden Tips


I choose to not use chemicals in my garden spaces.

There are many natural (and free) ways to take care of garden problems. In fact you probably have the ingredients in your home right now.


#1 Cinnamon:

1. I use cinnamon to deter ants, inside or outside. 

If I pour a straight line of cinnamon, the ants do not cross it. If there are gaps, they will go through the gap. But my experience has been that the ants get to the cinnamon line and turn around.

2. I also use cinnamon as a rooting agent. When I have a cutting, I pour a little cinnamon on a paper towel. Then I turn the stem all the way around in the cinnamon until it is completely coated, and plant the cutting.

Cheap cinnamon will do the trick!




Take advantage of cinnamon fungicide control by making a cinnamon spray for plants. Stir some cinnamon into warm water and allow it to steep overnight. Strain the liquid through a coffee filter and put the results into a spray bottle. Spray the stems and leave of affected plants, and mist the potting soil in plants that have a mushroom problem.

Read more at Gardening Know How: Benefits Of Cinnamon On Plants: Using Cinnamon For Pests, Cuttings, & Fungicide https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/info/using-cinnamon-on-plants.htm
Take advantage of cinnamon fungicide control by making a cinnamon spray for plants. Stir some cinnamon into warm water and allow it to steep overnight. Strain the liquid through a coffee filter and put the results into a spray bottle. Spray the stems and leave of affected plants, and mist the potting soil in plants that have a mushroom problem.

Read more at Gardening Know How: Benefits Of Cinnamon On Plants: Using Cinnamon For Pests, Cuttings, & Fungicide https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/info/using-cinnamon-on-plants.htm
#2 Coffee Grounds: 

1. I use it to deter snails and slugs around my plants. They particularly love to munch on my hostas.

2. It is one of the very best free fertilizers. 

As a matter of fact, when I lived in Texas, my neighbor had Starbucks hold bags of coffee grounds for her. And when we were out and about doing our Meals On Wheels route, we often stopped to pick them up.

Here's what it adds to your garden soil:
Nitrogen: 2.28 percent
Phosphorus: 0.06 percent
Potassium: 0.6 percent 


Just work the coffee grounds into the soil.

3. Use it as a thin mulch. Don't lay it on thick or you'll have fungus problems. 



#3 Baking Soda:

1. Spray to Treat and Prevent Powdery Mildew
Spray Recipe: 1 tablespoon of baking soda, 1 gallon of water, 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil, and 1 tablespoon of dish washing liquid. 

Mix all the ingredients together and spray plants weekly. Apply on overcast days to prevent any potential foliage from burning.
  
3. Discourage Gnats In Soil & Fungus On Leaves
Spray Recipe: Mix in 1 gallon of water, 4 teaspoons baking soda, 1 teaspoon biodegradable soap. 

Mix well, spray infected foliage or soil as needed. 



#4 Egg Shells:


1. Use to start seedlings. Once the seed sprouts, you can plant it directly into the garden, which will add calcium to the soil.

2. For a slug and snail deterrent, rinse and then crush when dry. Sprinkle coarsely crumbled egg shells around plants.  

3. When planting tomatoes or peppers, add approximately 1 dozen crushed egg shells per plant to the planting hole to prevent blossom end rot.
  

 #5 Epsom Salt:

1. Use as a fertilizer spray. Dissolve 2 tbsp. Epsom salts in 1 gallon of water. Then mist plants. 

Epsom salt contains sulfur and magnesium.



If you have any frugal and natural garden tips, please share in the comments. 

Please do your best to stay away from chemicals in your garden. 

A natural garden is a happy garden.

Plus pets and birds will be safer as well.


To use coffee grounds as fertilizer, work the coffee grounds into the soil around your plants. Leftover diluted coffee works well like this too.

Read more at Gardening Know How: Composting With Coffee Grounds – Used Coffee Grounds For Gardening https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/composting/ingredients/coffee-grounds-gardening.ht
To use coffee grounds as fertilizer, work the coffee grounds into the soil around your plants. Leftover diluted coffee works well like this too.

Read more at Gardening Know How: Composting With Coffee Grounds – Used Coffee Grounds For Gardening https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/composting/ingredients/coffee-grounds-gardening.

11 comments

  1. You have such lovely and healthy plants! Love your patio!

    ReplyDelete
  2. This is fantastic! We do get lots of snails--way more than in the garden in the U.S. (Maybe that's why the French eat snails: they have tons of them.) I will try the eggshell and coffee grounds tricks. I love that your friend made a deal with Starbucks. That is recycling. Or upcycling!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thank you for some great tips for the garden. Have a great day.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I'm going to try the eggshell and coffee ground tricks right away. We get lots of snails (is that why the French eat snails? There are so many?)
    Bravo to your friend for cutting a deal with Starbucks. Brilliant! Recycling--or is it upcycling?

    ReplyDelete
  5. Great tips, Brenda! I love to compost my kitchen scraps, including my eggshells and coffee grinds. I have two small composters, side by side, one is always active/in use while the other is 'cooking.' I'm going to empty the one that's ready in the next week or so and mulch my rosebushes with it - and the base of the composter collects the 'compost tea' which I will dilute and use to fertilize my gardens.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I use 20% vinegar mixed with a little dish washing soap to kill weeds. Works in a flash.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thank you Brenda for your tips on Chemical free gardening, I love to do anything that will do no harm. I am telling my husband not to dig out the dandelions as I heard these are food for the bees. I will certainly try your tips on what to do with cinnamon, I noticed some ants on my pathway just this morning.

    ReplyDelete
  8. There are articles about companion planting that describe how some plants help keep insects from other plants. If you do a search for the phrase companion planting you can come up with charts and articles on the topic. I have no idea if it's really valid or not, but, when I raised a big vegetable garden it was fun to put various herbs and flowers near the veggies they were supposed to help. Made for a pretty garden, anyway!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hi,
    I'm glad to see that someone is carrying on the traditional non-chemical ideas for growing flowers and food in the garden. I started doing it in the '70's when I was starting my family. Most people would rather use the quick chemical way. Glad to see that someone is carrying the torch into the next generation. Thanks for all your lovely posts, I really enjoy reading them.
    Sincerely,
    Alice G.

    ReplyDelete
  10. You Rock Brenda!!! I will use all of these suggestions!!! Great Post!

    ReplyDelete

I always enjoy reading your comments and having you join the conversation here at Cozy Little House. It is like having a gathering of friends sitting in my cozy apartment. Enjoying coffee and dessert, chatting and having a good time. I appreciate each and every one of you!

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Brenda has been writing since grade school. She majored in professional writing/journalism in college, where she won awards for her feature writing. She loves to decorate, garden, enjoy nature, read and spend time with her Yorkies.

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